Monthly Archives February 2014

Why I’m Writing This Blog

The whole subject of introversion is one that I’ve always felt but until recent years had not been able to articulate.  I guess I experienced it, but didn’t have a name for my experience.  One of the typical ways quiet leaders feel this reality is as a vague nagging sense of inadequacy.  It’s not always spoken, though sometimes it is by others and often by us in our own heads.  Whether it’s spoken or not, we feel it.  I have come to understand this as the reality that we feel as a result of being different from the dominant culture
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Well-Intentioned Help from Extroverts

I’m wondering if you’ve had similar experiences.  Throughout my forty-eight years, I’ve had various individuals try to help me improve myself.  The problem?  As I reflect back on their “help,” it had everything to do with me becoming like them, which meant me not being me.  I don’t think they meant me harm, but rather that they were so convinced that the way they were, extroverted, was the way to be a leader, to be healthy, to be a good person.  Why wouldn’t we want to help someone become a better person? We all struggle with this bias, but in
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When Whit Got It

My friend and colleague Whit Mitchell is a wonderful man.  I’m just getting to know him myself but know that if you met him you would immediately like him.  He’s one of those kinds of people.  He is most definitely the life of the party using his high energy and enthusiasm to make any teambuilding session an enjoyable experience.  Whit is an executive coach that works with us as part of our network at Price Associates.  We recently had a retreat for our team.  Whit, as only he could do, adeptly facilitated the “icebreaker” kinds of activities that got people,
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Introverted Leaders

This article was posted previously at Price Associates. “Hi, I’m Andy. I’m an introvert.” “Hi, Andy.” So goes the typical introduction at the local support group for non-extroverts. So many of us have, for far too long, considered this aspect of ourselves to be something we would rather keep private (after all, we are introverts) than let it be known to others and bear the brunt of their attempts to fix us (make us more outgoing and extroverted). We sometimes allow others to treat us as if we have a disease. Perhaps we need to rethink our view of this
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