Coming Out of the Closet

Published previously on LinkedIn We store things in closets. They aren’t made for people; they are made for things. Perhaps the reason people are found in closets has to do with the way we have failed to treat them as people and instead have treated them as if they were things. This is yet another aspect of what Simon Sinek calls “the problem of abstraction,” not seeing people as people. I’ve never much liked closets. The closet is a place of darkness, of isolation. There are no windows. It doesn’t necessarily smell good. The air doesn’t move. It doesn’t feel
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Don’t Be a George!

I spoke this morning at the Future of Leadership event in Boise, Idaho on the subject of The Yin and Yang of Complete Leadership. My theme was the need for us to regain healthy balance between the complimentary aspects of introverted and extroverted leadership styles. As a starting point for the discussion, I chose George III of England, a notoriously bad example of leadership. George’s leadership directly contributed to the need and desire for the American colonies to get out from under his oppressive reign. As a leader, he utterly failed. We would do well to learn from three of
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Introvert Advantage in Leadership Competency Webinar

Here’s the recording of the April 3, 2014 webinar.  (Apologies for the intermittent sound problems.  It sounds weird in places but you can still hear the content). On April 3rd, I presented a webinar comparing the 25 workplace competencies of the TTI TriMetrix™ HD Assessment and The Complete Leader with the natural strengths of introversion. I gave rationale for my leanings toward introversion or extroversion as having a natural advantage or disadvantage for each. As I explained, you may see things differently. I would love to hear from you if that’s the case. If you’d like to score the 25
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A Thought Revolution

Revolution is a term that evokes a reaction.  Our own revolution that secured our independence from the tyranny of King George is a somewhat distant or even nostalgic memory for most of us.  More likely, when we think of revolution, we see it in terms of the more violent revolutions of the last century.  The Bolshevik revolution in Russia was messy.  Castro’s revolt in Cuba was equally bloody.  Other more recent revolutions that reflected higher ideals than these did not come without a high cost either.  The Civil Rights movement in the U.S., though initially and fundamentally a quiet and
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Devaluing Others in Conflict

Posted previously at Price Associates I’ve written previously in Pushing Back Entropy about my personal contention that devaluation of others always precedes conflict in the form of direct or indirect attack.  Listening to Ron Price explain axiology this morning, that process became a bit clearer for me.  So adding to what I’ve said previously, let me try to explain the process of moving toward conflict through the lens of axiology. Axiology, the brain child of Robert Hartman, forms a significant piece of the TTI TrimetrixHD™ assessment that we use with clients.  Axiology is a way of objectifying value, the goodness
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Why I’m Writing This Blog

The whole subject of introversion is one that I’ve always felt but until recent years had not been able to articulate.  I guess I experienced it, but didn’t have a name for my experience.  One of the typical ways quiet leaders feel this reality is as a vague nagging sense of inadequacy.  It’s not always spoken, though sometimes it is by others and often by us in our own heads.  Whether it’s spoken or not, we feel it.  I have come to understand this as the reality that we feel as a result of being different from the dominant culture
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