Archives for yin leaders

Yin Leader: Abraham Lincoln

“Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt.” – A. Lincoln In the West, we tend to emphasize leaders who are competitive, aggressive, outgoing and charismatic (a.k.a. extroverted). Extroversion is yang. Yin leaders are different. This series highlights those differences, pointing to effective leaders from today and throughout history that exemplify the other side of leadership. In truth, we need both kinds of leaders to be healthy and balanced in our organizations. Abraham Lincoln famously grew up in the backwoods of Kentucky. He was a quiet introverted boy who kept mostly
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The Importance of Developing Empathy as a Leader

Key Ways to Develop This Vital Trait Empathy is perhaps the most valuable skill for human beings to possess. There is increasing evidence that empathic living with others is the much-needed antidote to the self-absorbed individualism we’ve been suffering from as a culture and in the workplace for the last century. Author Roman Krznaric describes this as the movement from understanding humans as being primary driven by self-preservation, “homo self-centricus,” to being primarily socially connected to others, “homo empathicus.” We sat down with faculty member Andy Johnson to talk about the importance of empathy for leaders. What is empathy? I
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Yin Leader: Tony Hsieh

In the West, we tend to emphasize leaders who are competitive, aggressive, outgoing and charismatic (a.k.a. extroverted). Extroversion is yang. Yin leaders are different. This series highlights those differences, pointing to effective leaders from today and throughout history that exemplify the other side of leadership. In truth, we need both kinds of leaders to be healthy and balanced in our organizations. Tony Hsieh is the CEO of the online retailer Zappos.com. He is a great example of a yin leader who is challenging the status quo of yang-driven organizational thinking. He, along with the help of Brian Robertson, has created
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FAQs about Yin Leader Workshop

Yin Leader Workshop is a two-day intensive workshop for yin leaders (introverts & ambiverts) aimed at helping them better understand themselves and the misinformation they may have absorbed from the culture around them, begin to identify and work through the impact of the cultural bias, and begin to move toward an authentically yin leader who is comfortable and confident in their own skin. yin: a leader who doesn’t fit the Western extroverted stereotype of leadership, but who leverages an alternative set of competencies and natural talent patterns to lead in a different way As you consider attending or sponsoring someone
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Yin Leadership Development

There is a changing of the guard in the American workplace. Boomers are retiring. Busters remain only a small minority. Millennials are now the majority. Generation 2020 is coming. With the current shift in organizational demographics and leadership, the need for effective leadership development programs has never been greater. Large numbers of emerging leaders are in immediate need of effective training that will equip them to take open leadership chairs much sooner than previous generations. Many of these leadership development programs, however, are ineffective for a number of reasons. They’re too often off-the-shelf canned programs based almost exclusively on classroom
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Balanced Leadership: Our Greatest Need

t was 1776, June.  The Continental Congress was scheduled to meet in July to discuss the creation of a document that would explain their rationale for the war to break from British control of the colonies that had begun a year earlier.  This new nation, freshly aware of the downside of a singular leader in King George, convened to discuss the foundation of their new experiment.  Leadership was on their mind. The unofficial leader of the group was John Adams, a lawyer from Massachusetts.  He, along with four others, was placed on the committee to draft the new document.  Everyone initially
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Yin Leadership Challenge: Self Acceptance

Carl Rogers built an entire counseling theory on the core human need for self-acceptance. Believing that the rejection that we have experienced from significant others is at the root of our psychological struggle, Rogers set out to give his clients a gift: unconditional positive regard. What we now know is that this aspect of Rogers’ theory is the greatest factor in the therapeutic relationship. Being accepted by others as we are opens the door for us to begin to accept ourselves. I would argue that no greater struggle exists for an introvert than the possession of self-acceptance. Because our nature
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Introverted Leaders

This article was posted previously at Price Associates. “Hi, I’m Andy. I’m an introvert.” “Hi, Andy.” So goes the typical introduction at the local support group for non-extroverts. So many of us have, for far too long, considered this aspect of ourselves to be something we would rather keep private (after all, we are introverts) than let it be known to others and bear the brunt of their attempts to fix us (make us more outgoing and extroverted). We sometimes allow others to treat us as if we have a disease. Perhaps we need to rethink our view of this
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Courageous Introverts

This article originally appeared in the Price Associates magazine. The business and organizational world is reawakening to the value of introverted leaders. In any cultural movement (e.g. the women’s movement of the 20s or the civil rights movement of the 60s), it is required that a few courageous frontrunners step forward breaking the new ground. Existing power structures typically resist these attempts that challenge the status quo. Introverts, unlike extroverts, are dispositionally less comfortable with change, less prone to take risk, and more conflict-avoidant. However, when the present state of affairs creates sufficient internal energy, the requisite moral courage to
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